Courses

ECONOMIC HISTORY, 15th – 20th CENTURY


Teaching Staff: Kakridis Andreas
Course Code: ΙΝΣ101
Course Type: Compulsory
Course Level: Undergraduate
Course Language: Greek
Semester: 6th
ECTS: 5

Short Description:

The course offers a short introduction to economic history from the dawn of modern times to the 20th century. As such, it surveys the basis characteristics and evolutionary stages of the global economy from the age of exploration and discovery, placing relatively more emphasis on European developments. At the same time, the course explores more specific topics such as the evolution or money and credit, the implications of international trade and the broader role of institutions and culture in accounting for the relative economic performance in the long run.


Objectives - Learning Outcomes:

The course aims at familiarizing students with basic economic concepts as well as certain fundamental questions that are at the forefront of research in economic history· what is more, the course hopes to highlight the significance of economic parameters in interpreting historical phenomena.

 

Upon successful completion of the course, students shall be able to:

  • outline the periods and key turning points in modern economic history;
  • compare the performance of individual geographical areas;
  • define economic development as well as analyze and prioritize its key determinants;
  • discuss and contrast different interpretations of the Great Divergence as well as th Industrial Revolution;
  • use and interpret tables and charts containing historical economic data.

 


Syllabus:

Week 1:               Content, tools and sources of economic history; measuring economic welfare; gross domestic product· price indices and deflating nominal values; the Great Divergence.

Week 2:               Economic growth: a theoretical model; factors of  production; gains from specialization and division of labour; diminishing returns; the role of technology; population growth (and Malthusian concerns).

Week 3:               The starting point: the medieval economy; the role of geography; Europe’s recovery after the post-roman crisis (9ος-15ος αιώνας)· conditions in the rest of the world on the eve of European expansion.

Week 4:               Europe’s grand opening: explorations and expansion. The development of long-distance trade and colonialism (Spain, Portugal, Netherlands, Britain). Mercantilism.  

Week 5:               The industrial revolution: content and evolution. From proto-industrialization to industrialization; key sectors and the shift in principal energy sources.

Week 6:               The industrial revolution: causes and interpretations. The role of institutions; the role of technology; the role of culture; the role of colonies; the role of luck. Why in Europe and why in Britain;  

Week 7:               The spread of the industrial revolution to the European mainland in the 19th century; contrast to earlier stages of industrialization· the issue of finance and credit.

Week 8:               Meanwhile, elsewhere Ι: Latin America and the Middle East.

Week 9:               Meanwhile, elsewhere II: China and Japan.

Week 10:             Reaching the 20th century: the Great Depression of 1929 and post-war developments: decolonization; from Europe’s golden age to the crisis of the 1970s; China’s resurgence.

Week 11:             Special focus topic Ι: International trade and globalisation.

Week 12:             Special focus topic II: Money, credit and banking.

Week 13:             Special focus topic ΙΙΙ: Institutions and culture in economic development.


Suggested Bibliography:

Landes, David S. (2005), The wealth and poverty of nations: why some are so rich and some are so poor. Athens: Livanis Publishing House. [Greek translation of 1998 English edition]

Persson, Karl Gunnar & Sharp, Paul (2018), An economic history of Europe: knowledge, institutions and growth, 600 to the present. Athens: Diplographia Publications. [Greek translation of 2015 English second edition]

Heilbroner, Robert L. & Mildberg, William (2010), The making of economic society. Athens: Kritiki Publications. [Greek translation of 2008 English edition]


Teaching Methods:

The course is based on weekly lectures, supported by appropriate educational material and student discussion. The e-class platform offers a guide to the literature as well as links to additional material (class handouts, book excerpts, scientific journal articles, statistical data sources & audiovisual material available on-line).


Evaluation Methods:

Final written examination with the option of improving the final grade through by taking part in an optional mid-term exam.


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